Raised In Knoxville

WUOT’s Raised in Knoxville plays on the old saying that country music was born in Bristol and raised in Knoxville. This exciting, multifaceted project includes newly commissioned music, a seven-episode podcast series, special episodes of WUOT’s Flipside, a Raised in Knoxville edition of WUOT’s monthly call-in show Dialogue, and we even gave a free live concert on September 6th.  

A short documentary on the making of the songs is here

Podcasts here:

https://www.wuot.org/post/raised-knoxville-songs

https://www.wuot.org/post/raised-knoxville-bristol-sessions

https://www.wuot.org/post/cas-walker-stories

https://www.wuot.org/post/did-knoxville-run-country-music

https://www.wuot.org/post/raised-knoxville-singer-songwriter-anne-buckle-metcalfs-journey-bristol-nashville

https://www.wuot.org/post/raised-knoxville-con-hunley-part-1

https://www.wuot.org/post/raised-knoxville-con-hunley-part-2

You can also hear all the podcasts on I-tunes on the Studio 865 page. 

Raised in Knoxville was funded through a grant from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting to launch a project that will help support the premier of the new PBS Documentary Country Music: A Film by Ken Burns. Eight years in the making, the eight-part, 16-hour documentary chronicles the highs and lows of country music’s early days, from southern Appalachia’s songs of struggle, heartbreak, and faith to the rollicking Western swing of Texas to California’s honky-tonks and Nashville’s Grand Ole Opry. Country Music will premiere Sunday, September 15, and will stream for free on various PBS platforms, including PBS.org and the PBS Video app. 

“WUOT is excited to be part of this project celebrating East Tennessee’s own country music scene—past, present, and future,” said WUOT’s music director, Todd Steed.

WUOT’s partners on the Raised in Knoxville project include East Tennessee PBS, WDVX Public Radio, the Museum of Appalachia, the Birthplace of Country Music Museum, the Knoxville History Project, the Tennessee Archive of Moving Image and Sound, the Arbor recording studio, Appalachian Media Archives, the UT Office of Communications and Marketing’s video unit, UT’s Department of History, and local musicians and graphic designers.

You can read the full press release and catch a video teaser by clicking here.