Matthew S. Schwartz

Matthew S. Schwartz is a reporter with NPR's news desk. Before coming to NPR, Schwartz worked as a reporter for Washington, DC, member station WAMU, where he won the national Edward R. Murrow award for feature reporting in large market radio. Previously, Schwartz worked as a technology reporter covering the intricacies of Internet regulation. In a past life, Schwartz was a Washington telecom lawyer. He got his J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center, and his B.A. from the University of Michigan ("Go Blue!").

A tropical storm brewing in the Gulf of Mexico is poised to drench coastal areas of Texas and Louisiana over the next several days. It's just the latest of a fairly active tropical season, which has already wrought devastation on many parts of the U.S.

Updated August 22, 2021 at 5:54 PM ET

President Biden said on Sunday that the U.S. has evacuated nearly 28,000 people from Afghanistan since Aug. 14, including around 11,000 people in about 36 hours over the weekend.

In a televised address from the White House, Biden said the administration's first priority in Kabul is getting American citizens out as soon as possible. They've used phones, emails, and other forms of communication to locate Americans and try to move them to the American compound, he said.

Amanda Knox — who once spent almost four years in an Italian prison for murder — was long ago exonerated by Italy's highest court, which ruled that "stunning flaws" in the police investigation had inappropriately led to Knox's conviction for the murder of her roommate, British exchange student Meredith Kercher.

Nigerian athlete Chioma Onyekwere, who had trained for years to hone her discus skills, considered competing at the Tokyo Games to be the pinnacle of her career.

"This is supposed to be one of the happiest moments of my life," she said.

Instead, because Nigerian athletic officials hadn't conducted enough drug tests over the past several months, Onyekwere and nine other Nigerians unexpectedly found themselves disqualified this week.

Since his arrival at the Olympic Village, tennis star Novak Djokovic has regaled fellow athletes with his techniques for mental strength, dealing with pressure, and "how to bounce back if you lost your focus."

Two weeks after undergoing an operation to remove half of his colon, Pope Francis delivered his Sunday blessings to a crowd of several hundred gathered in St. Peter's Square.

After ruminating on the importance of rest — "it is not enough to 'unplug' ourselves" he said, "we need to truly rest" — Francis turned to the turmoil and social unrest engulfing many parts of the world.

The Barty party has begun.

The No. 1 ranked Ashleigh Barty beat Karolina Pliskova in three sets Saturday, becoming the first Australian woman to win Wimbledon since 1980. Her victory came 50 years after Barty's idol, Australian Evonne Goolagong Cawley, won her first Wimbledon title.

"It took me a long time to verbalize the fact that I wanted to dare to dream it," the 25-year-old Barty said of her Wimbledon hopes. "Being able to live out my dream right now, with everyone here, has made it better than I ever could have imagined.

Nine people are now confirmed dead from the Surfside, Fla. condominium collapse, officials announced Sunday. Additional human remains have also been found. More than 150 people are still missing.

Search and rescue efforts were being hampered by smoke from a fire that was smoldering deep in the rubble. After firefighters were able to put the fire out by around noon Saturday, crews could continue searching the rubble, Miami-Dade County Mayor Daniella Levine Cava told reporters.

Just one month after an engineering report warned of "major structural damage" that required immediate repair, a Surfside, Fla., official assured residents of Champlain Towers South that their building was sound.

Updated June 26, 2021 at 5:56 PM ET

A structural engineering report provided to the Champlain Towers condominium association in 2018 found widespread problems that required extensive repairs "in the near future."

The consulting group that wrote the report noted Saturday that the document "detailed significant cracks and breaks in the concrete, which required repairs to ensure the safety of the residents and the public."

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