Hannah Allam

Hannah Allam is a Washington-based national security correspondent for NPR, focusing on homegrown extremism. Before joining NPR, she was a national correspondent at BuzzFeed News, covering U.S. Muslims and other issues of race, religion and culture. Allam previously reported for McClatchy, spending a decade overseas as bureau chief in Baghdad during the Iraq war and in Cairo during the Arab Spring rebellions. She moved to Washington in 2012 to cover foreign policy, then in 2015 began a yearlong series documenting rising hostility toward Islam in America. Her coverage of Islam in the United States won three national religion reporting awards in 2018 and 2019. Allam was part of McClatchy teams that won an Overseas Press Club award for exposing death squads in Iraq and a Polk Award for reporting on the Syrian conflict. She was a 2009 Nieman fellow at Harvard and currently serves on the board of the International Women's Media Foundation.

How many of President Trump's supporters swarmed into Washington, D.C. this weekend for the Million MAGA March? More than a million, as the White House says? Hundreds of thousands, as the president asserts? Maybe 10,000 or so, as local authorities estimate?

The answer: It doesn't matter.

Trump supporters, including families with children, as well as fringe groups, such as white nationalists, are gathering in DC for the "Million MAGA March."

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Right-wing activists pushing baseless claims that the presidential election was "stolen" mobilized in several cities over the weekend, drawing people to the streets through networks forged during summertime protests against lockdowns.

Domestic terrorism analysts have warned for weeks about the possible triggers of election-related violence: a protracted vote count. Claims of rigging. Rampant disinformation. Protesters and vigilantes.

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

The moderator was polite enough not to make it Question 1. But, oh, it was coming.

This face-off in Hailey, Idaho, wasn't a typical debate night. Beforehand, incumbent state Sen. Michelle Stennett, a Democrat, had sought assurances for her safety, fearing riled-up supporters of her Republican opponent, Eric Parker. He, in turn, posted guards outside to avoid a ruckus like the one at a recent GOP picnic. That time, a heckler interrupted Parker's speech to call him a domestic terrorist.

The news raced through the encrypted chats of leaders in the far-right militia movement: The Feds got Barry Croft.

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NOEL KING, HOST:

Minds are made up about Kyle Rittenhouse, the 17-year-old gunman charged in the killing of two protesters in Kenosha, Wis. Graphic amateur video of the chaotic scene and early reports from authorities tell a partial story, and politics fills in the blanks.

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