Chas Sisk

Chas joined WPLN in 2015 after eight years with The Tennessean, including more than five years as the newspaper's statehouse reporter.Chas has also covered communities, politics and business in Massachusetts and Washington, D.C. Chas grew up in South Carolina and attended Columbia University in New York, where he studied economics and journalism. Outside of work, he's a dedicated distance runner, having completed a dozen marathons

Tennessee House Speaker Glen Casada said on Tuesday he plans to step down from his position. 

Casada's decision comes hours after the House Republican Caucus cast an unprecedented 45-24 no-confidence vote in Casada, after racist and lewd text messages between him and his former chief of staff were leaked to the media. 

Stephen Jerkins/WPLN File Photo

House Speaker Glen Casada has been fighting for his political life. And it's not the first time his reputation has been on the line.

Many lawmakers have called for the Franklin Republican to step down. That's after the leaking of sexist and racist text exchanges with a top aide, his now-former chief of staff, Cade Cothren.

WPLN senior editor Chas Sisk spoke with Jason Moon Wilkins about why this isn't just a crisis for Casada, it's a problem for Tennessee’s Republican Party as a whole.

The following are excerpts from recent interviews about the scandal:

House Speaker Glen Casada issued a written apology Wednesday for a series of racist and sexist texts between him and a top aide and put out an "action plan" meant to restore trust in his office — all in an effort to head off a serious challenge to his leadership.

There have been many changes in the last few weeks to Gov. Bill Lee’s Education Savings Accounts proposal.

The legislature is still workshopping the details of the school voucher plan. And GOP leaders are trying to convince rural lawmakers on the fence, to vote for the bill.

Gov. Bill Haslam wraps up eight years in office at the end of this week. His tenure has been marked by some nationally recognized successes — like boosting college enrollment — and one big defeat: the failure of his Medicaid expansion plan, Insure Tennessee.

The hotly contested Senate race between Marsha Blackburn and Phil Bredesen will be closely watched Tuesday night — and not just by people in Tennessee.

After more than a year of campaigning, it's finally time for Tennesseans to make their selections for governor and U.S. senator.

And election officials are expecting a big surge in interest when early voting starts this week.

Nashville Public Radio's Sergio Martínez-Beltrán and Chas Sisk have been tracking the campaigns. They joined host Jason Moon Wilkins to discuss where both races stand.

Republican businessman Bill Lee wasn't known to many Tennesseans before this year's race for governor. He'd been a major fundraiser for the GOP. But he'd never run for public office of any kind.

Lee touts that as a virtue.

In the latest in a series of interviews with the six leading candidates for governor, Lee sat down with WPLN's Chas Sisk.

Knoxville businessman Randy Boyd has been one of Governor Bill Haslam's most trusted advisers. Now, Boyd wants to follow in Haslam’s footsteps all the way to the state Capitol.

The Tennessee legislative session came to a late-night end last week, but some of the bills approved in the final hours might not make it all the way to becoming law.

In this week's edition of The Tri-Star State, Nashville Public Radio's Jason Moon Wilkins and statehouse reporter Chas Sisk discuss what legislation could miss the governor’s signature, as well as other lingering issues.

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