Dialogue: Can Tennessee Improve Its Rural Healthcare System?

Aug 4, 2021

More than a quarter of Tennessee counties don’t have a hospital and a fifth don’t even have an emergency facility, though they may have an ambulance service. When a hospital closes or there's no hospital at all, rural economies suffer. It's impossible to recruit businesses and to keep employers, residents, and retirees in the area. The communities impacted by all of this are disproportionately made up of the uninsured, the elderly, the chronically ill, and those living in poverty.

WUOT's Chrissy Keuper spoke with members of state agencies, nonprofits, and social justice advocacy about what the present and future look like for healthcare in Tennessee’s rural counties.

Guests:

Dr. Carole Myers - Professor, University of Tennessee College of Nursing
Jacy Warrell - Executive Director, Rural Health Association of Tennessee
C
handa Freeman - Health Policy Team Program Manager, Tennessee Justice Center
J
udy Roitman - Executive Director, Tennessee Health Care Campaign
B
ill Jolley - Senior Vice President, Rural Health Issues, Tennessee Hospital Association
T
ina Pilgreen - Director, Tennessee Office of Rural Health
L
ogan McCoy - Special Projects Director, Tennessee Department of Economic & Community Development

Other Links:

Center for Rural Health Research

Tennessee Center for Health Workforce Development

Rural Equity Project Report Release: Rural Hospital Closures

Protecting Tennessee's Rural Hospitals: 2021 Conference (September 2021)

Tennessee Department of Health Uninsured Adult Healthcare Safety Net Annual Report 2020

Rural Emergency Hospital Overview (April 2021)