Becky Sullivan

Becky Sullivan has reported and produced for NPR since 2011 with a focus on hard news and breaking stories. She has been on the ground to cover natural disasters, disease outbreaks, elections and protests, delivering stories to both broadcast and digital platforms.

In January 2020, she traveled to Tehran to help cover the assassination and funeral of Iranian military leader Qassem Soleimani, work that made NPR a Pulitzer finalist that year. Her work covering the death of Breonna Taylor won an Edward R. Murrow Award for Hard News.

Sullivan has spoken to armed service members in Afghanistan on the anniversary of Sept. 11, reported from a military parade in Pyongyang for coverage of the regime of Kim Jong-Un, visited hospitals and pregnancy clinics in Colombia to cover the outbreak of Zika and traveled Haiti to report on the aftermath of natural disasters. She's also reported from around the U.S., including Hurricane Michael in Florida and the mass shooting in San Bernardino.

She previously worked as a producer for All Things Considered, where she regularly led the broadcast and produced high-profile newsmaker interviews. Sullivan led NPR's special coverage of the 2018 midterm elections, multiple State of the Union addresses and other special and breaking news coverage.

Originally a Kansas Citian, Sullivan also regularly brings coverage of the Midwest and Great Plains region to NPR.

After a close upset loss in the U.S. Open, a tearful Naomi Osaka told reporters she may take an indefinite break from tennis — marking another setback in what has been a turbulent, difficult year for the tennis superstar.

LES CAYES, Haiti — When shaking started on the morning of Aug. 14, Dr. Antoine Titus was still in bed.

It was 8:29 a.m., and the 32-year-old emergency room physician was about to get up and get ready for work at the general hospital in Les Cayes.

What should have been an ordinary Saturday at the ER instead became a day he cannot forget. For what seemed like 10 minutes, Titus watched the earth shake and homes collapse as his neighbors — the ones who survived, at least — prayed and cried.

Samoa will be led by a female prime minister for the first time in its history after an appeals court ruling ended a months-long constitutional crisis in the Pacific island nation.

In a major escalation of pressure on NFL teams to vaccinate as many players as possible before the start of this fall's season, the NFL says that teams will forfeit and be slapped with a loss if a game is cancelled because of a COVID-19 outbreak among their unvaccinated players — and neither team's players will be paid.

CIA Director William Burns says he has redoubled the agency's efforts to uncover the cause of Havana syndrome — the mysterious set of ailments that has afflicted more than 200 U.S. officials and family members around the world.

There is broad agreement that the restaurant industry is rife with sexual harassment.

The University of North Carolina has become the first college athletics program to organize group licensing deals for its current student athletes, in the latest development of the sea change transforming college athletics.

The death rate from COVID-19 in the U.S. is rising steadily for the first time in months as the nation grapples with a renewed burst of cases in what's become "a pandemic of the unvaccinated," the head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Friday.

The seven-day average of new cases has increased by nearly 70% to almost 30,000 per day; hospitalizations are up 36%. And deaths from the virus have risen steadily in recent days, reversing a months-long downward trend that began in mid-January.

With Euro 2020 and the Stanley Cup in the books, the NBA Finals nearing an end, baseball past the All-Star break, and the Olympics a week away — sports are running full steam ahead, even as cases of COVID-19 tick up across the U.S.

Many stadiums and arenas in the U.S. have allowed fans to return at full capacity with many dropping mask requirements following a year of pandemic restrictions that prevented spectators and travel.

Plans for the Tokyo Olympics, which bring together athletes from around the world, are going ahead as scheduled next week.

A new Minnesota executive order sets out to protect minors in the state from so-called "conversion therapy," circumventing multiple defeats of statewide proposals in the Minnesota state legislature.

The new order, signed Thursday by Gov. Tim Walz, seeks to limit minors' access to the practice, which aims to convert a person's sexual orientation or gender identity to heterosexual or cisgender. The therapy is widely discredited by medical experts.

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