Chrissy Keuper

All Things Considered Host/Reporter

Chrissy is WUOT's local All Things Considered host. Her first job with the station was as a weekend student announcer while earning her bachelor's in Anthropology from the University of Tennessee. From 2004 to 2015, she served as the station's local host for Morning Edition. In that role, Chrissy won multiple awards for her reporting and interviewing, as well as hosting WUOT's monthly public affairs series Dialogue.

Chrissy took a break in the autumn of 2015 and wrote for Cityview magazine, writing about East Tennessee military veterans. But, she says, her heart never left WUOT. She returned in July 2019.

Keuper is a native of Johnson City, Tennessee. In her free time, she serves on the boards of the Marble City Opera and Discover Life in America, leads book discussions for Knox County Public Library's "All Over the Page" series, and enjoys the many offerings of a growing Knoxville, specifically the city's art galleries, restaurants and greenways.

https://news.virginia.edu/content/qa-what-redistricting-and-why-it-controversial

The League of Women Voters of Tennessee is holding public redistricting hearings around the state. East Tennessee's meeting is scheduled for Tuesday, October 19th in Chattanooga. WUOT’s Chrissy Keuper spoke with League President Debby Gould about what’s expected from these hearings.

 

https://tennesseelookout.com/2021/06/24/redistricting-in-tennessee-an-explanation-of-how-the-system-works/

Redistricting discussions are underway in both chambers of the Tennessee legislature. WUOT’s Chrissy Keuper spoke with State Representative Karen Camper, House Democratic Leader and member of the House Select Redistricting Committee.

https://tennesseelookout.com/2021/06/24/redistricting-in-tennessee-an-explanation-of-how-the-system-works/

Redistricting discussions are underway in both chambers of the Tennessee legislature. WUOT’s Chrissy Keuper spoke with State Senator Raumesh Akbari, Chair of the Senate Democratic Caucus and member of the Senate Ad Hoc Committee on Redistricting.

 

Nurses are suffering because of the pandemic.  We hear reports of stress, burn-out, depression, anxiety, demoralization, moral and ethical conflict, anger, and suicide among nurses. Dr. Carole Myers of the University of Tennessee College of Nursing speaks with Dr. Sandy Leake, Senior Vice President and Chief Nursing Officer at University of Tennessee Medical Center.

https://www.cmohs.org/

A flag-raising at Knoxville’s World’s Fair Park has kicked off the year-long preparation for the Congressional Medal of Honor Convention in Knoxville in September, 2022. WUOT’s Chrissy Keuper spoke with Joe Thompson, President of the Board of Directors who are planning next year’s gathering. 

Congressional Medal of Honor Society

Medal of Honor Character Development Program

WUOT’s Chrissy Keuper and Dr. Carole Myers of the University of Tennessee College of Nursing catch up on a couple of health matters that have gone by the wayside during the pandemic:

Cancer screenings and dental care.  

 

https://www.brennancenter.org/sites/default/files/styles/700x350/public/2020-10/brennan-center-redistricting-power-map-final-v2-flattened.jpg?itok=TFywPEMG

Tennessee’s General Assembly is beginning a redistricting process that will impact both the state legislature and federal congressional districts. WUOT’s Chrissy Keuper spoke with Tennessee House Speaker Cameron Sexton and Lieutenant Governor Randy McNally about what’s involved in that process. 

TN House Select Committee - Redistricting

Dr. Carol Myers spoke with Zack Buck of the University of Tennessee College of Law, who specializes in health law.  His scholarship examines the enforcement of laws that affect health and health care in the United States.

The results of the 2020 U.S. Census are out. Tennessee has seen continued population and economic growth as well as a changing demographic landscape in the last decade. In September's Dialogue, WUOT's Chrissy Keuper spoke with Stephanie Bohon, Nicholas Nagle, and Tim Kuhn about the data and what that growth and change mean for the state and for Tennesseans.

 

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