Dialogue on WUOT

The first Wednesday of the month, noon - 1:00 p.m. ET

WUOT's monthly live call-in program; hosted by a member of WUOT's news staff. 

We'll take your calls at 865-974-5050; tweet us @WUOTFM or submit your question on WUOT's Facebook page. 

Tennessee’s elderly residents have been among the first to be vaccinated for COVID-19 and many are already making big plans for the next year. WUOT's Chrissy Keuper and guests from the state, the East Tennessee region, and Knox County will look back at how the pandemic has affected the lives of Tennessee seniors over the last year and what that could mean for the future, for all of us.

Guests:

Tennessee's General Assembly spent a week in January working through new education legislation that aims to address pandemic learning loss. Advocates say there's still a long road ahead to equity in education both during, and after the pandemic.

The killings of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and Ahmaud Arbery last year prompted a shift in opinions about institutional racism, relationships among people, police and governments, and reckoning with past and present. In this edition of Dialogue, we’re asking what has changed in Knoxville, and what more needs to be done in the near future. Host Brandon Hollingsworth is joined by three guests working to put ideas into action:

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2020-09-02/trump-eviction-moratorium-brings-new-questions

The last year has been tough, to say the least, and the new year could present a whole new set of problems: An eviction moratorium is due to expire at the end of December, many Tennesseans remain unemployed or underemployed, and many faced food insecurity before the COVID-19 pandemic even began. WUOT's Chrissy Keuper and guests discussed what people are facing and where they can turn for help.

Guests:

With a record number of absentee ballots cast, ongoing legal battles around voting rights and a health pandemic with spiking case rates: this election is unprecedented. 

 

After the polls close, and as the country awaits the results from the presidential election, WUOT's Claire Heddles is joined by a panel of experts to talk about what's next for Tennessee. 

Flickr, via Creative Commons, Neil Alexander McKee

This year marks the 250th anniversary of Beethoven’s birth, and music lovers around the world are celebrating the milestone. On this edition of Dialogue, host Brandon Hollingsworth asks his guests how Beethoven became synonymous with classical music in the public eye, and why his legacy is so large. The group will also discuss how music organizations are changing concert programming and hiring practices to include more people of color.

In January, Tennessee was in good economic shape after a decade or more of consistent growth. Jobs were prevalent. Businesses, especially small businesses, were enjoying good times. But in March, the COVID-19 pandemic brought lockdowns statewide, meaning record business closures and unemployment. 

So, where are we now?

This year marks the 30th anniversary of the signing of the Americans with Disabilities Act. The landmark legislation broadened the scope of institutions barred from discriminating against people with disabilities.

capitol.tn.gov

The Tennessee General Assembly is a hive of political activity even in a slow year. This has not been a slow year. The plans laid out by Governor Bill Lee in his State of State message in February were torn up and rewritten in March as COVID-19 closed businesses and schools and a sharp economic recession followed. Lawmakers felt safe enough to reconvene in June. That session was marked by disagreement, the race to finish a tight budget and a reckoning with race and its role in the halls of the Capitol building.

https://www.neworleans.com/plan/transportation/trains/

WUOT's Chrissy Keuper hosted our June Dialogue, as we got out of lockdown and took the train with Todd Steed. He was our tour guide for his pre-COVID jazz music travelogue that became the podcast, “Improvisations to Go”. 

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