Sergio Martínez-Beltrán

Sergio Martínez-Beltrán is Nashville Public Radio’s political reporter. Prior to moving to Nashville, Sergio covered education for the Standard-Examiner newspaper in Ogden, Utah. He is a Puerto Rico native and his work has also appeared on NPR station WKAR, San Antonio Express-News, Inter News Service, GFR Media and WMIZ 1270 AM.   

In his free time (once in a blue moon), Sergio can be found playing volleyball or in Flamenco Beach in Culebra, Puerto Rico. He is a graduate of Michigan State University and the coolest uncle (feel free to fact-check) to Olivia and Jimena. 

Sergio Martínez-Beltrán, WPLN News

The first case of coronavirus has made its way to Tennessee, Gov. Bill Lee announced Thursday.

“As of last night we have our first confirmed case of COVID-19 in Tennessee,” Lee said.

The patient is a 44-year-old man who lives in Williamson County who traveled out of state recently, but not internationally. He flew nonstop between Boston and Nashville International Airport but showed no symptoms while he was traveling. He has been back in Tennessee for four to five days.

Health officials say they are coordinating with their counterparts in Massachusetts.

C-SPAN screenshot

On a recent chilly afternoon last week at Nashville’s Centennial Park, Sean Michel was walking his dog with a friend.

This was also the first day of impeachment hearings against President Donald Trump. Michel didn’t hesitate to share his thoughts on impeachment.

“I just think the sides are stupid. Republicans are stupid. Democrats are stupid,” Michel said. “We are all stupid and it’s just pointless in my opinion.”

Flickr, via Creative Commons

Tennessee is not going to reach an ambitious educational goal set by the state in 2015, data released Wednesday show. 

The state had hoped to outperform the national average by the end of the decade. But Nation's Report Card shows that student growth in the state has remained stagnant.

On the eve of the election of a new House speaker, Republican lawmakers chose to Rep. Jeremy Faison as the new caucus chairman. 

Stephen Jerkins, WPLN

Presumed Tennessee House Speaker Cameron Sexton is asking the state’s top attorney to issue an opinion on whether an embattled lawmaker could be expelled.

The request is related to an effort to kick out Rep. David Byrd, R-Waynesboro, who has been accused by three women of sexual assault  while he was their high school coach over 30 years ago.

He wants the attorney general to clarify whether it’s even constitutional to kick Byrd out of the House for incidents that allegedly happened decades before he became a legislator.

Tennessee lawmakers will come back to Nashville later this week to pick a new House speaker.

The election will take place during Friday’s special session, which was called with specific guidelines on what can and cannot take place.

A two-day hearing on a bill that would essentially ban all abortions in Tennessee ended with high tensions and complaints about a lack of diversity in the witness list.

Out of 21 people who talked about the measure, only one was an African American woman.

Thousands of state lawmakers from all across the country are in Nashville this week, as part of the National Conference of State Legislatures' summer summit.

Many of the attendees are rising political stars in their own states. But, they have been upstaged by someone else — Dolly Parton.

Followers of Tennessee state politics have a new name to focus on: Cameron Sexton.

The Crossville Republican is set to replace Glen Casada as House Speaker after a vote by the House GOP caucus last week.

Republicans in the Tennessee House of Representatives are set to elect their pick to replace Glen Casada.

Six men will try to convince fellow lawmakers Wednesday to vote for them by positioning themselves as a different kind of leader.

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