Chrissy Keuper

All Things Considered Host/Reporter

Chrissy is WUOT's local All Things Considered host. Her first job with the station was as a weekend student announcer while earning her bachelor's in Anthropology from the University of Tennessee. From 2004 to 2015, she served as the station's local host for Morning Edition. In that role, Chrissy won multiple awards for her reporting and interviewing, as well as hosting WUOT's monthly public affairs series Dialogue.

Chrissy took a break in the autumn of 2015 and wrote for Cityview magazine, writing about East Tennessee military veterans. But, she says, her heart never left WUOT. She returned in July 2019.

Keuper is a native of Johnson City, Tennessee. In her free time, she serves on the boards of the Marble City Opera and Discover Life in America, leads book discussions for Knox County Public Library's "All Over the Page" series, and enjoys the many offerings of a growing Knoxville, specifically the city's art galleries, restaurants and greenways.

http://www.picturestoryblog.com/2010/01/tornado-sewanee-tennessee-using-the-camera-you-have.html

The National Weather Service says the number of tornadoes in the US this year is way down. But WUOT’s Chrissy Keuper reports the numbers in Tennessee are above average for the year…

Transform Now Plowshares

A judge has ruled that three protesters will stay in jail until their sentencing in September and that releasing them would be too lenient. Sister Megan Rice, Michael Walli and Greg Boertje-Obed were convicted last week of sabotaging and damaging federal property last July at the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge. The three face up to 30 years each for the crimes. Their sentencing is scheduled for September 23 of this year.

The current civil conflict in Syria has just entered its third year and the U.S. government is weighing a decision over whether to provide official foreign aid and support to the country. Dr. Jaber Hassan is a Syrian-American doctor living and practicing in Maryville., Tenn. He's made several trips to Syria during this conflict, providing medical care with the Syrian American Medical Society. He recently returned from Syria and spoke with WUOT's Chrissy Keuper.

 

An affidavit alleges top-level officials within the Pilot/Flying J Corporation knew about a long-running scheme to defraud money from some commercial customers.  According to the affidavit, Pilot has for years been skimming money from customer rebates, lowering the rebate rate without telling the customer, then paying the customer less than they were owed.  WUOT's Brandon Hollingsworth stayed up late reading the affidavit and spoke with Morning Edition's Chrissy Keuper. 

Chattanooga Times Free Press

The Tennessee State House approved Governor Bill Haslam’s $32.8 billion budget with a few minor changes by an 83-14 margin Wednesday.  Thursday morning, the Senate unanimously agreed to the changes and the budget proposal is now headed to Haslam's desk for his signature.   The budget sets aside more than $100 million for a 1 1/2 % pay-raise and other pay adjustments for state employees and $46 million for state employee health insurance.  The budget allocates $350 million for increased enrollment in TennCare under the new federal health care law.  In Education, $127 million of the new budge

Temple Grandin was in Knoxville recently to address a Veterinary Social Work summit sponsored by the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine.  Grandin is a professor of Animal Science at Colorado State University  and is  well-known among animal welfare advocates for improving the conditions in large cattle slaughter facilities. Now, more than half of all the cattle slaughtered in the U.S. and Canada are processed by equipment that she designed. She spoke with Chrissy Keuper about how slaughter plants can be made more humane.

The Confucius Institute is celebrating its grand opening at the University of Tennessee. The institute is part of a worldwide movement, with more than 300 Confucius Institutes open in more than 100 countries. Chrissy Keuper spoke with the UT institute's director, Geography professor Shih-Lung about what's behind this movement and why UT is now a part of it.

http://www.windowmagazine.org/window/images/3-2/1304099570tigers%20dinerstein%20portrait.jpg

Optimism isn’t often a word that people associate with conservation efforts, and certainly not with endangered animal species that compete with humans for habitat.

Eric Dinerstein is the lead scientist for the World Wildlife Fund. He told WUOT's Chrissy Keuper that he’s optimistic because he’s seen that large-scale conservation IS possible... 

Girls of the Atomic City: The Untold Story of the Women Who Helped Win World War II is now a bestselling book about the women who worked on one of the nation’s most secret projects in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Chrissy Keuper recently spoke with author Denise Kiernan, who says she was moved to research and write the book after seeing a photo taken by Department of Energy photographer Ed Westcott.  

When it opened on Broadway in 1959, the now-classic play, "A Raisin in the Sun" was the first to have a black principal cast, director and playwright. Lorraine Hansberry's play takes place in 1950's Chicago, focusing on a black family buying and attempting to make a home in an all-white neighborhood. The Clarence Brown Theatre at the University of Tennessee is putting on a new production of the play.  Chrissy Keuper speaks with director Woodie King, Jr. about the play and the era in which it was written.
 

Pages