Chrissy Keuper

All Things Considered Host/Reporter

Chrissy is WUOT's local All Things Considered host. Her first job with the station was as a weekend student announcer while earning her bachelor's in Anthropology from the University of Tennessee. From 2004 to 2015, she served as the station's local host for Morning Edition. In that role, Chrissy won multiple awards for her reporting and interviewing, as well as hosting WUOT's monthly public affairs series Dialogue.

Chrissy took a break in the autumn of 2015 and wrote for Cityview magazine, writing about East Tennessee military veterans. But, she says, her heart never left WUOT. She returned in July 2019.

Keuper is a native of Johnson City, Tennessee. In her free time, she serves on the boards of the Marble City Opera and Discover Life in America, leads book discussions for Knox County Public Library's "All Over the Page" series, and enjoys the many offerings of a growing Knoxville, specifically the city's art galleries, restaurants and greenways.

When it opened on Broadway in 1959, the now-classic play, "A Raisin in the Sun" was the first to have a black principal cast, director and playwright. Lorraine Hansberry's play takes place in 1950's Chicago, focusing on a black family buying and attempting to make a home in an all-white neighborhood. The Clarence Brown Theatre at the University of Tennessee is putting on a new production of the play.  Chrissy Keuper speaks with director Woodie King, Jr. about the play and the era in which it was written.
 

This year, an album of historic music from the Smoky Mountains competed for a Grammy award. Old Time Smoky Mountain Music was up for the Best Historical Album Grammy, against the likes of Woody Guthrie and Sir Paul McCartney, among others. WUOT's Morning Edition host Chrissy Keuper has this look at the music and the history of these recordings.

To say that Jim Vlna (pronounced VUL-nuh) has spent his life in the zoo is really no exaggeration. Vlna has just retired as director of the Knoxville Zoo after almost 22 years. Prior to that, he spent 30 years with the Brookfield Zoo in Illinois, starting work there when he was 13 years old. WUOT's Morning Edition host Chrissy Keuper speaks with Vlna about some of the changes he’s seen in zoological parks over the years, including some fairly recent adjustments in philosophy.

Researchers with the University of Tennessee recently published a study that could one day mean an exciting new treatment for cancer. Biomedical Engineering researcher Yongzhong Wang and his colleagues study nano-particles, already an important part of therapy for cancer and other disease. Nano-particles are usually created through chemical engineering. Wang says what makes this study unique is that this is the first time researchers have captured the nano-particles from a micro-organism for use in this therapy.

The American Museum of Science and Energy in Oak Ridge is exhibiting a collection of paintings that are a bit unusual for the museu, exploring the culture of the atomic era in the 1950's.  WUOT's Morning Edition host Chrissy Keuper has this look at "Doomtowns:  The Atomic Art of Doug Waterfield".

Dr. Eirug Davies describes himself as a physicist who tried to retire. Now he teaches in the Celtic Department at Harvard University and is a preeminent researcher on the history of Welsh populations and Welsh language in the US. Davies says the first great influx of Welsh immigrants was in the 1830's, mostly to coal-mining towns in Pennsylvania. Davies was in Knoxville and spoke to WUOT's Morning Edition host Chrissy Keuper about some Tennessee connections to his research: Knoxville, Lake City(once called Coal Creek) and a man named David Thomas.

As early voting in Tennessee gets underway, Knoxville voters will cast ballots that could change the city charter. At issue: the pension plan for city workers. Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero has proposed what she calls a "hybrid" pension plan. It would apply to any employee hired after January 1, 2013, and would close the current pension plan. Changes will include a rise in retirement age and an increase in the pension vesting period (from 5 years to 10 years). The new plan would also put limits on defined benefits, or those benefits guaranteed by the city.

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