HealthConnections

Tuesdays during Morning Edition and All Things Considered

The brainchild of University of Tennessee associate professor Dr. Carole Myers, HealthConnections will bring the often-abstract world of health care, coverage and policy to a human level. What is access? How do marketplaces work? What's the future of health insurance? Dr. Myers and WUOT's Brandon Hollingsworth will sort through these issues and more, all to give you a toolbox for understanding what you hear on the news, or to separate fact from fiction in the health care debate.

Conversations about health care and health policy are, unsurprisingly, characterized by divisions common to the current political climate. But one area of common ground is care for those with pre-existing conditions.

Before the Affordable Care Act in 2010, pre-existing conditions were a barrier to health insurance, and by extension, securing good medical care.

When you think about the factors that control health and wellness, you might think about diet, exercise or vaccinations. But do you think about housing? On the next HealthConnections, we explore the ways housing – or the lack thereof – affects the health of individuals and their communities.

The American Cancer Society's "How Do You Measure Up?" report measures each of the fifty states in nine areas considered important for cancer treatment and prevention. This year, Tennessee recieved below-average marks.

In this edition of HealthConnections, a look at Tennessee's cancer report card. Advocate and cancer survivor Michael Holtz speaks with Dr. Carole Myers about where Tennessee ranked in categories that range from palliative care to screenings and prevention.

Navigators help uninsured Tennesseans choose health coverage on the individual marketplace. The federal government plans to cut funding for that program for the second year in a row. The Trump Administration argues the program has been successful, and fewer people need the help. Health insurance advocates say it's too soon to consider navigators obsolete.

Knox County's Community Health Council, now in its fifth year, studies public health patterns, makes recommendations to civic leaders and creates plans to improve the health of the county's residents.

Pages