Victor Agreda, Jr.

Morning Edition Host/Producer

Victor Agreda comes to WUOT with 10 years of experience in the media field, managing DownloadSquad, Engadget Spanish, Autoblog Spanish, DIYLife, and The Unofficial Apple Weblog for AOL. During his time at TUAW, Victor tested thousands of apps, and worked closely with developers and innovators in the technology field.

Victor holds degrees from the University of Tennessee (English) as well as Watkins in Nashville (Film Editing). Victor has created content for television and the web, and has been a speaker at SXSW and 360 Intersect, and has been interviewed on BBC Radio and Fox Business News.

Victor’s passion lies in storytelling and empowering local businesses and individuals in the region. Victor lives in Fountain City, and has two teenage children, Belle and Weston.

This year the FCC reversed a rule enforcing "net neutrality" on the Internet. What are the implications? There's been a lot of misunderstanding and fear around the subject, worrying some about service providers creating fast and slow lanes for traffic, or outright blocking some services. I spoke to Stuart Brotman, an expert on communications policy, about what the change really means for consumers.

Tennessee schools will reconvene for many in early August. As with any year, they will welcome a new class of kindergartners and with them the hopes and fears of parents sending them away on their own for the first time. But, during the summer weeks remaining there are ways parents can help prepare their kids for those first experiences of attending school. I spoke to Dani Thibus of the University of Tennessee’s Early Learning Center for tips to prepare children for their first year.

  

  

When the Department of Energy designated Knoxville as a Solar City a decade ago, the number of solar installers was smaller, the public wasn’t as informed on the benefits of solar, and there were only two medium sized photovoltaic (PV) systems in the city. One was a 15-kilowatt system at Ijams Nature Center, and the other was an 8-kilowatt system at Mellow Mushroom near UT campus. How far have we come since then? And what are the options for homeowners looking to reduce their bills?

The Great Smoky Mountains National Park is the most visited park in the country, but how safe is it? What precautions should you take if you go hiking or camping? These are good questions for David Brill. He's an avid hiker, adjunct UT professor, and author. His latest book, Into the Mist, tells the story of the dangers that befell the park's visitors dating back to the Great Depression.

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