Brandon Hollingsworth

News Director

Brandon is WUOT’s news director. In that role, he oversees the station's daily news operations. He also hosts Dialogue and produces the biweekly series HealthConnections. For seven years, Brandon was WUOT's All Things Considered anchor. From 2008 to 2010, he hosted Morning Edition on Alabama Public Radio. For two years before that he served as an APR bureau correspondent and Morning Edition anchor at WLJS-FM in Jacksonville, Ala.

Brandon's work has been heard nationally on the flagship NPR newsmagazines Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the network's newscast service. He has contributed to NPR's midday newsmagazine, Here and Now, and his work has aired on West Virginia Public Broadcasting's Inside Appalachia.

Brandon is a 2008 graduate of Jacksonville State University, and holds a B.A. in communications. He is a native of St. Clair County, Alabama.

Ways to Connect

Ben Pounds, Oak Ridger

For many years, workers who blamed health issues on work they did at federal nuclear or chemical facilities had little recourse. That began to change in 2000, when Congress authorized money to pay medical expenses and other costs. But obtaining and filing the required documentation to get that money is laborious, complicated and frustrating.

The American Cancer Society's "How Do You Measure Up?" report measures each of the fifty states in nine areas considered important for cancer treatment and prevention. This year, Tennessee recieved below-average marks.

In this edition of HealthConnections, a look at Tennessee's cancer report card. Advocate and cancer survivor Michael Holtz speaks with Dr. Carole Myers about where Tennessee ranked in categories that range from palliative care to screenings and prevention.

Dilip Vishwanat, Getty Images

R.A. Dickey has a fascinating story to tell. His childhood in Middle Tennessee was full of challenges. He attended a prestigious private school, but lived in part by squatting in empty houses. His path to professional baseball was nearly demolished before it could be built. Once there, he still struggled, and found simply keeping a job meant cultivating a famously unpredictable pitch that few had mastered.

Elizabeth Aaron

Leonard Bernstein's Candide has almost as tortuous a journey as its title character. From its awkward 1956 debut in New York, the show was modified, sliced, diced and stripped in the 1960s and 70s. Bernstein himself poured years of effort into matching a troubled libretto to his epic music, turning out another version in 1989. Different stagings formed a kind of theatrical a la carte, employing unusual sets, constuming and approaches.

So Cal MacLean has his work cut out for him.

Navigators help uninsured Tennesseans choose health coverage on the individual marketplace. The federal government plans to cut funding for that program for the second year in a row. The Trump Administration argues the program has been successful, and fewer people need the help. Health insurance advocates say it's too soon to consider navigators obsolete.

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